ANR HOMES

The HOMES project is part of the Household Archaeology research impetus and aims to model the economic, anthropological and ideal organisation of the first Neolithic farming societies in continental Europe. The striking reproducibility of LBK dwelling types and culture (linear pottery known as LBK pottery, sixth millennium BC) over nearly a millennium and an area of 3000 km throughout continental Europe, provides exceptional archaeological evidence of the European Neolithic. For this reason, it has sparked lively debates within the community of Neolithic scholars for almost 50 years. Various theories have been put forward to understand the structuring of these dwellings, and to assess how this structuring could contribute to our understanding of the social system of these first mixed farming populations, by adopting a migrationist, demographic, economic, ideal or social point of view.

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ANR PRC – Collaborative Research Projects – N° ANR-18-CE27-0011-01

2019-2022 (48 months)

25 participants

Coordinator: C. Hamon

The HOMES project is part of the Household Archaeology research impetus and aims to model the economic, anthropological and ideal organisation of the first Neolithic farming societies in continental Europe. The striking reproducibility of LBK dwelling types and culture (linear pottery known as LBK pottery, sixth millennium BC) over nearly a millennium and an area of 3000 km throughout continental Europe, provides exceptional archaeological evidence of the European Neolithic. For this reason, it has sparked lively debates within the community of Neolithic scholars for almost 50 years. Various theories have been put forward to understand the structuring of these dwellings, and to assess how this structuring could contribute to our understanding of the social system of these first mixed farming populations, by adopting a migrationist, demographic, economic, ideal or social point of view.
In this context, the Homes project is original in that it proposes an integrative and systemic model with very high anthropological and spatial resolution of the different rules of economic and social integration underlying the exceptional durability and adaptability of the LBK culture. By approaching the notion of household from material, ideal, individual and collective perspectives in a deliberately restricted workshop area (the Aisne valley), the Homes project seeks to test new hypotheses on different levels of village integration based on archaeological data (Hachem and Hamon 2014, Gomart et al. 2015). It will attempt to define: (1) the development of economic maturity and the food production capacity of self-sufficient households, (2) interdependence between households structured around reciprocity networks and artisanal redistribution, (3) the integration of individuals from outside the village community ensuring cultural cohesion at a supra-regional scale.
The HOMES project endeavours to produce wide-ranging hypotheses in a resolutely multidisciplinary framework by associating new archaeometric developments (petrography, tomography, chemical analyses) with bioarchaeology (archaeobotany, isotopes). This will be facilitated by the selection of a targeted sample and the application of systematic very high resolution archaeological, archaeozoological and techno-functional analyses. The project will be structured into four workshops, including three thematic workshops and a final geostatistical modelling workshop: Workshop 1-Organisation and levels of integration of artisanal skills, Workshop 2-Food production and consumption, Workshop 3-Status, life and death of individuals, Workshop 4-Spatial and statistical modelling of interactions between households.
The Homes project will compare new scenarios with already existing hypotheses from other regions of LBK Europe, in order to question the reproducibility of the LBK social system, in time and space. It will also attempt to understand whether the social structure of LBK groups in the Paris Basin fully conforms with a tradition, or a certain social conservatism, inherited from central Europe, or whether it reflects innovative dynamics on the fringe of a waning colonisation movement.
The Homes project thus advocates a dynamic, evolutionary and integrative high-resolution interpretation of the social processes at stake in Neolithization mechanisms, and aims to fundamentally renew our knowledge of the rules and networks governing the first agricultural populations of Europe.

20181018_100051.jpgReconstruction of a Neolithic house, la Haute Île (93) Archeosite

Led by: UMR 8215 Trajectoires (coord. C. Hamon)

  • Laurent Aubry (CNRS)
  • Jerome Dubouloz (CNRS)
  • Louise Gomart (CNRS)
  • Michael Ilett (Univ. Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne)
  • Nicolas Cayol (Inrap)
  • Lamys Hachem (Inrap)
  • Caroline Hamon (CNRS)
  • Yolaine Maigrot (CNRS)
  • Corinne Thevenet (Inrap)

Autres Participants

  • Allard Pierre (CNRS, UMR 8055 Pretech)
  • Balasse Marie (CNRS, UMR 7209)
  • Salavert Aurélie (MNHN, UMR 7209)
  • Aguileira Maria (Lleida University)
  • Price Douglas (Wisconsin University)

Partenaires

EA3795 GEGENAA Reims – Geomateriaux (coord. G. Fronteau) (link)

  • Gilles Fronteau (Univ Reims)
  • Vincent Barbin (Univ Reims)
  • Alain Devos (Univ Reims)
  • Xavier Drothière (Univ. Reims)
  • Jean Hubert (Univ. Reims)

UMR 7269 LAMPEA – Anthropology, Isotopes (coord. E. Herrscher) (link)

  • Estelle Herrscherr (CNRS)
  • Guy Andre (CNRS)
  • Vincent Balter (CNRS)
  • Theo Tacail (post-doctoral student UMR 5276)

Bristol University / Organic Geochemistry Unit (OGU) (coord. R.Evershed) (lnik)

  • Richard Evershed (Professor)
  • Roffet-Salque Melanie (post-doctoral student)

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See also in «Current projects»

Chalcolithic lithic industries of Sultana My research focuses on the lithic industries of the Chalcolithic sites of Sultana, thanks to new excavations led by C. Lăzăr, and includes training a Romanian student in lithic technology. Autour du grand tell daté du Gumelnița et fouillé en 1924 (Andrieșescu 1924), se trouvent des sites plats et des cimetières couvrant l’ensemble du Chalcolithique : Boian pour l’étape ancienne et Gumelnița pour l’étape récente. Les sites sont installés dans la grande plaine loessique roumaine, sur la rive droite du Moștistea, affluent du Danube, et aujourd’hui au bord du lac artificiel de Moștistea. Contribution to the monograph on the Varna Necropolis Three bilingual (German, English) volumes dedicated to the necropolis of Varna, Das Varna Gräberfeld, will be published by Philipp von Zabern, in the DAI Eurasian Series, edited by V. Slavčev. I am in charge of the lithics, which I comprehensively reviewed after the recent revision of the funerary inventories. The multidisciplinary approach will combine technological and typological data, in connection with raw material supplies and types of production, as well as the functional analysis carried out by M. Gurova. L. Manolakakis in V. Slavčev, Dir. (2020, à paraître) IRP NORth (2020-2023) The Eastern European model of Neolithization contrasts with that of the West, in terms of modes and chronology. In the central Russian plain, the beginning of the Neolithic is dated between the second half of the 7th and 6th millennia BC, depending on the region considered, and is defined by the emergence of sedentarism and the appearance of ceramic technology. Despite occasional contacts with mixed farming groups, local populations maintained a lifestyle based on hunting, fishing and gathering. It was not until several millennia later that a real production economy was adopted and became widespread in the area (3rd and 2nd millennia BC). Based on the duration and the breakdown of events recorded in the Russian plain, we can follow the history of communities in the process of Neolithization in a very original way.